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Hi, it's been way to long since I updated my journal so I decided to do so right now. :) Life is great, we were blessed with another granddaughter 7 months ago. We love seeing our family grow and tend to stay pretty busy with all of them.   I am still drawing and taking commissions, and I'm still teaching online drawing lessons each month.  Have also been having some fun making jewelry, working with copper and silver and mostly creating earrings. 

I'll post a couple of newer drawings in a few.  If you are interested in taking drawing lessons email me for more information: imaginee_art@midtel.net

Take care and I will try and stop in more often. ~Linda
Hi there, it's been way to long since I updated my DA journal.  I have been busy teaching drawing online and also working on commissions.  I'll place a few new drawings in my gallery and I'll place more info on the lessons below.  On a personal note I found out Christmas day I will become a grandma :) I look forward to meeting that sweet little baby and spoiling her with tons of love!  Life is great and I couldn't be happier.  

UPDATE:
On July 4th our grandaughter Riley was born!  We are all so very happy to have this little angel in our lives. :)

Other news: I am the featured artist at the Artisan's Gallery in Middleburgh, NY 12122.  Many peices of my work will be on display and for sale from July 4th to August 4th. If you are in the area please stop by.


The drawing lessons are month to month through emails. Basically I work with you on a drawing from the beginning to the end.  Drawing in a hyper-realistic style is not hard to do but it does take time and a great amount of patience. The best part about the lessons is you work each week on small sections (till they are finished) but only on as much as time allows. I check over your weekly update inch by inch and give written help and also visual help.  You can read more about the lessons on my site here:  
midtel.net/~imaginee/drawing_l…

After reading the info on my site you can then email me for prices and to sign up.  I have seen lots of improvement from many of my students.  Before and after images can be seen on the "students" page.  Please know the months fill up quickly so space is limited.

At this time I want to thank all of you for the comments on my work and favorites.  :)
Take care ~Linda

-----------

A little invite to my DA friends

Journal Entry: Wed May 12, 2010, 4:45 PM
Hi there, I have a semi new account on Facebook "Imaginee Art". If you would like to be added I made the account public:  www.facebook.com/profile.php?i…

Oh and do not join any of the facebook groups that were created for me. The groups have my full name, drawings and info but they also have many other artists work mixed in with mine, so these groups are misleading.


A few months back I redesigned my main website: midtel.net/~imaginee/



IMAGINEE Drawing Tips ::

Deciding on a new drawing takes much time, not only does the reference photo have to be clear and large but it needs to be detailed and interesting, also have excellent contrast. If I am drawing something new (that I have yet to draw) I will look at many references and take in as much info as possible before starting, I want to see the subject from all sides.

After I select a reference I draw out a 1/2 - 1 inch grid using an h pencil. I then print out a few copies of the ref. one I print the grid on, one is printed out darker (to better see shadows), one is lighter (to see details in shadows) and a few are close up's....it varies with each drawing. I draw a very light outline and then begin.... I start with the upper left corner and work my way down and to the right. I tend to turn the reference and drawing upside down and draw much of the piece like this, you can see shapes much easier this way. I am constantly reminding myself to look closer at the subject, see the fine details and draw everything, look at how the shadows fade away and draw it that way, see the different textures and draw them as they are. Details make the piece come alive so never pass up on any!

Only use good contrast photos (lots of darks and light tones) a good balance makes for a great drawing. Draw what you see in the reference but also draw what you know it should look like. Use a mirror when drawing a portrait, besides the photo reference you are your best reference. Most of what we draw is made up of precisely blended tones, so keep that in mind always. Rushing through an area can ruin the whole piece so never EVER rush. Finishing a small area at a time gives you the same feeling as when you finish the whole piece (u need to program yourself).

I use mostly a 3B, B and H pencil, some plain tissue and a blending stick/stump. I draw a few details in a small area and then color in tones and blend them with the tissue, I then go back over that area and darken up the details and put a new layer down, blend and repeat if needed. If I am shading an area and I want it to be as dark as possible I never blend, I just color the area in with close together pencil strokes and then go back over it a few times until it is as dark as I can get it. Highlights are left untouched and if they do get smudged I lighten em up with the kneaded eraser. I use a Mechanical pencil for all details...wood pencils are great for filling in tones. I work about an inch an hour on detailed areas. I use different illustration boards, any name brand Mechanical pencil and Derwent wood pencils. I did use Strathmore 300 Series Bristol Board (smooth or vellum) for many years.

Here is a list of tips (most of what was said above)


- Use only clear large reference photos (get permission if it's not a free stock photo)
- Use good contrast photos (lots of darks and light tones) a good balance makes for a great drawing
- Print out the reference in grayscale, lighten the photo to better see shadowed areas (print different samples)
- Do not draw from full frontal flash photos, they will look flat
- Begin with a light outline (draw a one inch grid with the H)
- Use a clean piece of plain paper under your drawing hand to prevent any smudges
- Keep works in progress (wips) covered when your not working on them
- Work on a small, 1-2 inch area at a time, finish it to near perfection before moving on
- Use a mechanical pencil to draw in details, the point is always sharp
- Leave highlights untouched and draw around them, use the kneaded eraser to lift out highlights when needed
- Color in tones with light-med pressure making sure to keep you pencil strokes close together
- When coloring in an area use circular stokes making sure to overlap all
- Wrap a piece of clean plain tissue around one finger and blend your mid tones
- Blend medium tones and then recolor in the area, build your tones until they are realistic
- Blend all hard lines, unless they are also seen in the reference or in real life
- Use a mirror when drawing a portrait, besides the photo reference you are your best reference
- Use a 3b pencil to build up the darkest tones, layer them and do not blend for near black tones
- Go darker to give the drawing more depth
- Turn the drawing and reference upside down to better see and render shapes
- Draw ever tiny detail you see, it’s the details that give the drawing realism
- Use light layers of a workable fixative on the finished drawing to help reduce graphite shine and smudges
- Keep in mind that an artist never stops growing, like everything in life you learn as you go along, time truly is your friend.
- Oh and if you rush a drawing it will show so sloooooow way down and enjoy your artistic journey.

Here is a little info on how I scan my drawings: imaginee.deviantart.com/art/Sc…

A Recent Interview

Journal Entry: Fri Oct 16, 2009, 9:53 PM
I had the great pleasure this week of being interviewed by
Emily Stevenson (aka marotiel). Emily is a gifted writer and born interviewer, I loved how she put all the information together!
Please visit her blog to read this detailed interview: calebandemilydesigns.blogspot.…


I've updated my website with new information and a few new features. One is a service I am offering to graphite pencil artists. To read more please visit my site: www.midtel.net/~imaginee/


I want to also say a big thank you to everyone here at DA that has commented on and favored my drawings! :)

IMAGINEE Drawing Tips ::

Deciding on a new drawing takes much time, not only does the reference photo have to be clear and large but it needs to be detailed and interesting, also have excellent contrast. If I am drawing something new (that I have yet to draw) I will look at many references and take in as much info as possible before starting, I want to see the subject from all sides.

After I select a reference I draw out a 1/2 - 1 inch grid using an h pencil. I then print out a few copies of the ref. one I print the grid on, one is printed out darker (to better see shadows), one is lighter (to see details in shadows) and a few are close up's....it varies with each drawing. I draw a very light outline and then begin.... I start with the upper left corner and work my way down and to the right. I tend to turn the reference and drawing upside down and draw much of the piece like this, you can see shapes much easier this way. I am constantly reminding myself to look closer at the subject, see the fine details and draw everything, look at how the shadows fade away and draw it that way, see the different textures and draw them as they are. Details make the piece come alive so never pass up on any!

Only use good contrast photos (lots of darks and light tones) a good balance makes for a great drawing. Draw what you see in the reference but also draw what you know it should look like. Use a mirror when drawing a portrait, besides the photo reference you are your best reference. Most of what we draw is made up of precisely blended tones, so keep that in mind always. Rushing through an area can ruin the whole piece so never EVER rush. Finishing a small area at a time gives you the same feeling as when you finish the whole piece (u need to program yourself).

I use mostly a 3B, B and H pencil, some plain tissue and a blending stick/stump. I draw a few details in a small area and then color in tones and blend them with the tissue, I then go back over that area and darken up the details and put a new layer down, blend and repeat if needed. If I am shading an area and I want it to be as dark as possible I never blend, I just color the area in with close together pencil strokes and then go back over it a few times until it is as dark as I can get it. Highlights are left untouched and if they do get smudged I lighten em up with the kneaded eraser. I use a Mechanical pencil for all details...wood pencils are great for filling in tones. I work about an inch an hour on detailed areas. I use different illustration boards, any name brand Mechanical pencil and Derwent wood pencils. I did use Strathmore 300 Series Bristol Board (smooth or vellum) for many years.

Here is a list of tips (most of what was said above)


- Use only clear large reference photos (get permission if it's not a free stock photo)
- Use good contrast photos (lots of darks and light tones) a good balance makes for a great drawing
- Print out the reference in grayscale, lighten the photo to better see shadowed areas (print different samples)
- Do not draw from full frontal flash photos, they will look flat
- Begin with a light outline (draw a one inch grid with the H)
- Use a clean piece of plain paper under your drawing hand to prevent any smudges
- Keep works in progress (wips) covered when your not working on them
- Work on a small, 1-2 inch area at a time, finish it to near perfection before moving on
- Use a mechanical pencil to draw in details, the point is always sharp
- Leave highlights untouched and draw around them, use the kneaded eraser to lift out highlights when needed
- Color in tones with light-med pressure making sure to keep you pencil strokes close together
- When coloring in an area use circular stokes making sure to overlap all
- Wrap a piece of clean plain tissue around one finger and blend your mid tones
- Blend medium tones and then recolor in the area, build your tones until they are realistic
- Blend all hard lines, unless they are also seen in the reference or in real life
- Use a mirror when drawing a portrait, besides the photo reference you are your best reference
- Use a 3b pencil to build up the darkest tones, layer them and do not blend for near black tones
- Go darker to give the drawing more depth
- Turn the drawing and reference upside down to better see and render shapes
- Draw ever tiny detail you see, it’s the details that give the drawing realism
- Use light layers of a workable fixative on the finished drawing to help reduce graphite shine and smudges
- Keep in mind that an artist never stops growing, like everything in life you learn as you go along, time truly is your friend.
- Oh and if you rush a drawing it will show so sloooooow way down and enjoy your artistic journey.

Here is a little info on how I scan my drawings: imaginee.deviantart.com/art/Sc…

Featured on FujiTV

Journal Entry: Thu May 21, 2009, 11:25 PM
Hi, I wanted to let you know I will be seen on a the Japan show "Unbelievable". A camera crew came to my home today to video my artwork and interview me. The crew was here for 5 1/2 hours and I have to say it was one of the most interesting days, never have I been on tv. The show is only seen in Japan, they travel around the world looking for people with unbelievable skills, it's been on for 10 years and it's very popular. I was very honored to be asked to appear on the show. I will have the video of the show uploaded soon.


Here is a little info on how I scan my drawings: imaginee.deviantart.com/art/Sc…
I'll write up something on editing a digital photo soon :)



In a recent online article written about my artwork many comments were left, both positive and negative...here are two of the many I found interesting.

A comment left:

Full marks to the artist for skill.
But whatís the point of duplicating something you can now do more easily with photography? Thatís like insisting on connecting to the internet with a 2400 baud modem. Instead of focusing on what the artist can duplicate by hand, how about what the artist can do with her skill that is more original.

Comment left by anohter in response to above:

Instead of your 2400 baud modem analogy, I think it is more like driving from NY to California instead of flying. You get to the same place but you have two completely different experiences, and one has the potential for an adventure of sorts. Art isnít about doing everything the Ďeasyí way: if you equate everything artistic with modems and computer hardware, then of course you will not appreciate this artwork.

If you think that this isnít art, then you would also be opposed to the work of Ansel Adams. Most of his work uses only what nature gave him as a subject: his artistic expression was the manner in which he presented the subject, not the subject which he presented. If you donít consider this art then you have a very narrow view of art.

Art is not just about presenting a novel subject, it also involves the presentation of a subject in a manner which evokes emotion. Donít look at this like itís a photocopy: an artist with integrity will create something which is an expression of their own emotion, and this doesnít always involve fanciful or imaginary things. There is a lot of joy and pride to be derived from faithfully representing real life in another medium.

To those of you who think this isnít art, if you havenít tried graphite I urge you to do so: if you give it an honest shot youíll appreciate this so much more, even if you just Ďcopyí a photograph. Thank you Ms. Huber!


A question that has been asked of me many times:
How do you get your drawings to look so realistic?

I draw not only what I see but what I know! For example, from years of doing portrait work I know the anatomy of a face, I also know for realism you should never skip over any individual details. Details such as that perfect balance of light and shadow to define the shape of ones face, unique flickers of light in each eye, hair texture, (including eyelashes and eyebrows) and even pours in the skin. Often times when drawing extreme details I will not look at the whole and will turn the reference and drawing upside-down and work on a tiny section. This technique forces me to focus more intently on those details. It's so relaxing and so natural for me to draw in such a blind state.


IMAGINEE Drawing Tips ::

Deciding on a new drawing takes much time, not only does the reference photo have to be clear and large but it needs to be detailed and interesting, also have excellent contrast. If I am drawing something new (that I have yet to draw) I will look at many references and take in as much info as possible before starting, I want to see the subject from all sides.

After I select a reference I draw out a 1/2 - 1 inch grid using an h pencil. I then print out a few copies of the ref. one I print the grid on, one is printed out darker (to better see shadows), one is lighter (to see details in shadows) and a few are close up's....it varies with each drawing. I draw a very light outline and then begin.... I start with the upper left corner and work my way down and to the right. I tend to turn the reference and drawing upside down and draw much of the piece like this, you can see shapes much easier this way. I am constantly reminding myself to look closer at the subject, see the fine details and draw everything, look at how the shadows fade away and draw it that way, see the different textures and draw them as they are. Details make the piece come alive so never pass up on any!

Only use good contrast photos (lots of darks and light tones) a good balance makes for a great drawing. Draw what you see in the reference but also draw what you know it should look like. Use a mirror when drawing a portrait, besides the photo reference you are your best reference. Most of what we draw is made up of precisely blended tones, so keep that in mind always. Rushing through an area can ruin the whole piece so never EVER rush. Finishing a small area at a time gives you the same feeling as when you finish the whole piece (u need to program yourself).

I use mostly a 3B, B and H pencil, some plain tissue and a blending stick/stump. I draw a few details in a small area and then color in tones and blend them with the tissue, I then go back over that area and darken up the details and put a new layer down, blend and repeat if needed. If I am shading an area and I want it to be as dark as possible I never blend, I just color the area in with close together pencil strokes and then go back over it a few times until it is as dark as I can get it. Highlights are left untouched and if they do get smudged I lighten em up with the kneaded eraser. I use a Mechanical pencil for all details...wood pencils are great for filling in tones. I work about an inch an hour on detailed areas. I use Strathmore 300 Series Bristol Board (smooth or vellum), any name brand Mechanical pencils and Derwent wood pencils.

Here is a list of tips (most of what was said above)


- Use only clear large reference photos (get permission if it's not a free stock photo)
- Use good contrast photos (lots of darks and light tones) a good balance makes for a great drawing
- Print out the reference in grayscale, lighten the photo to better see shadowed areas (print different samples)
- Do not draw from full frontal flash photos, they will look flat
- Begin with a light outline (draw a one inch grid with the H)
- Use a clean piece of plain paper under your drawing hand to prevent any smudges
- Keep works in progress (wips) covered when your not working on them
- Work on a small, 1-2 inch area at a time, finish it to near perfection before moving on
- Use a mechanical pencil to draw in details, the point is always sharp
- Leave highlights untouched and draw around them, use the kneaded eraser to lift out highlights when needed
- Color in tones with light-med pressure making sure to keep you pencil strokes close together
- When coloring in an area use circular stokes making sure to overlap all
- Wrap a piece of clean plain tissue around one finger and blend your mid tones
- Blend medium tones and then recolor in the area, build your tones until they are realistic
- Blend all hard lines, unless they are also seen in the reference or in real life
- Use a mirror when drawing a portrait, besides the photo reference you are your best reference
- Use a 3b pencil to build up the darkest tones, layer them and do not blend for near black tones
- Go darker to give the drawing more depth
- Turn the drawing and reference upside down to better see and render shapes
- Draw ever tiny detail you see, it’s the details that give the drawing realism
- Use light layers of a workable fixative on the finished drawing to help reduce graphite shine and smudges
- Keep in mind that an artist never stops growing, like everything in life you learn as you go along, time truly is your friend.
- Oh and if you rush a drawing it will show so sloooooow way down and enjoy your artistic journey.

Thank you and a question...

Fri Nov 2, 2007, 11:28 AM
I wanted to say once again thank you to everyone that has visited and left comments, I appreciate it very much!

I also wanted to pass on some news: I was asked to teach a few drawing classes in town, at this time I am writing up an outline of the course. On paper it's easy but teaching in person to a group of people I don't know, well that's a little scary. A question to all of you that have taken art/drawing classes, what did you think of them, give me some pros and cons, I would like to do a good job but don't have anything to go by. Thanks :)



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
I have been asked many times for drawing tips, here are some I sent to a member a while back:

Tips and trade secrets I have many. Starting on a new drawing takes much time in selecting a great reference photo. Not only does the photo have to be clear and large but it needs to be detailed and interesting, also have excellent contrast. It takes me forever to select a ref....If I am drawing something new (that I have yet to draw) I will look at many references and take in as much info as possible before starting, I want to see the subject from all sides. After I select a ref I draw out a 1 inch grid using an h pencil, I then print out a few copies of the ref. one is for the grid one is printed out darker (to better see shadows), one lighter (to see details in shadows) and a few are close ups....it varies with each drawing. I draw a very light outline and then begin....

I start with the upper left corner and work my way down and to the right. I tend to turn the ref and drawing upside down and draw much of the piece like this, you can see shapes much easier this way. I am constantly reminding myself to look closer at the subject, see the details and draw everything, see how the shadows fade away and draw it that way, see the different textures and draw them as they are. Details make the piece come alive so never pass up on any!
Use good contrast photos (lots of darks and light tones) a good balance makes for a great drawing. Draw what you see in the ref but also drew what you know it should look like. Use a mirror when drawing a portrait, besides the photo reference you are your best reference. Most of what we draw is made up of precisely blended tones, so keep that in mind always.

Rushing through an area can ruin the whole piece so never ever rush. Finishing a small area at a time gives you the same feeling as when you finish the whole piece (u need to program yourself). I use mostly a 3b and H pencil, some plain tissue and a blending stick/stump. I draw a few details in a small area and then color in tones and blend them with the tissue, I then go back over that area and darken up the details and put a new layer down, blend and repeat if needed. If I am shading an area and I want it to be as dark as possible I never blend, I just color the area in with close together pencil strokes and then go back over it a few times until it is as dark as I can get it. Highlights are left untouched and if they do get smudged I lighten em up with the kneaded eraser. Using a Mechanical pencil is perfect for tiny details...wood pencils are great for filling in tones. I work about an inch an hour on details.

I use Strathmore 300 Series Bristol Board (smooth or vellum), any name brand Mechanical pencils and Derwent wood pencils.

I hope this was of some help ~Linda


---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

If you would like to buy a print or commission a drawing please email me: 1995imaginee@midtel.net
Anyone from DA will receive a discount! :D

d r i n k by imaginee Liv Tyler finished by imaginee
Depp by imaginee 1965 Mustang Fastback by imaginee
Droplet by imaginee Little Tiger by imaginee
Marilyn Monroe by imaginee e y e by imaginee
Halle Close-up by imaginee No Idea by imaginee

--------------------------------------------------------------------
I am a member of: :iconthepencilclub:
Visit my website: midtel.net/~imaginee/
I received the following note:

An administrator has relocated 3 of your deviations to scraps.

The adminstrator also said the following:
Works in progress belong in Scraps, since they are not finished pieces of art.

FAQ: Why was my deviation moved?
Moved Deviation #1: Marilyn Monroe
Moved Deviation #2: Depp
Moved Deviation #3: No Idea

Replies to this automated note will be lost; please use the help desk if you have any questions.


I think the administrator should look a tiny bit closer next time they move a finished peice*LOL* however they did move a couple of my wips to scraps (where they belong).  I have already moved 2 pieces back to my gallery, anyway I thought I would share this and ask if this has happened to you? :)  
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I have been asked many times for drawing tips, here are some I sent to a member a while back:

Tips and trade secrets I have many. Starting on a new drawing takes much time in selecting a great reference photo. Not only does the photo have to be clear and large but it needs to be detailed and interesting, also have excellent contrast. It takes me forever to select a ref....If I am drawing something new (that I have yet to draw) I will look at many references and take in as much info as possible before starting, I want to see the subject from all sides. After I select a ref I draw out a 1 inch grid using an h pencil, I then print out a few copies of the ref. one is for the grid one is printed out darker (to better see shadows), one lighter (to see details in shadows) and a few are close ups....it varies with each drawing. I draw a very light outline and then begin....

I start with the upper left corner and work my way down and to the right. I tend to turn the ref and drawing upside down and draw much of the piece like this, you can see shapes much easier this way. I am constantly reminding myself to look closer at the subject, see the details and draw everything, see how the shadows fade away and draw it that way, see the different textures and draw them as they are. Details make the piece come alive so never pass up on any! I was working on a portrait last night and I got to the ear and I must say an ear is great practice, there are so many little in's and outs (highlights and shadows), as I drew I knew the ear needs to be 3d looking so I took much time with it and have to say I am very happy I did. I drew what I saw in the ref but also drew what I know an ear looks like. Most of what we draw is made up of precisely blended tones, so keep that in mind always.

Rushing through an area can ruin the whole piece so never ever rush. Finishing a small area at a time gives you the same feeling as when you finish the whole piece (u need to program yourself). I use mostly a 3b and H pencil, some plain tissue and a blending stick/stump. I draw a few details in a small area and then color in tones and blend them with the tissue, I then go back over that area and darken up the details and put a new layer down, blend and repeat if needed. If I am shading an area and I want it to be as dark as possible I never blend, I just color the area in with close together pencil strokes and then go back over it a few times until it is as dark as I can get it. Highlights are left untouched and if they do get smudged I lighten em up with the kneaded eraser. Using a Mechanical pencil is perfect for tiny details...wood pencils are great for filling in tones. I work about an inch an hour on details.

I use Strathmore 300 Series Bristol Board (smooth or vellum), any name brand Mechanical pencils and Derwent wood pencils.

I hope this was of some help ~Linda


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A few of my drawings, email me if you would like to buy a print: 1995imaginee@midtel.net
Anyone from DA will always receive a discount! :D

d r i n k by imaginee b e l l o by imaginee Liv Tyler finished by imaginee Vulnerable by imaginee
Depp by imaginee Free Spirit by imaginee 1965 Mustang Fastback by imaginee The face of Elise by imaginee
Droplet by imaginee pick meee by imaginee Little Tiger by imaginee Concept Drawing - The Gift by imaginee
Jennifer Garner portrait by imaginee Marilyn Monroe by imaginee e y e by imaginee Marilyn by imaginee
Halle Close-up by imaginee No Idea by imaginee

--------------------------------------------------------------------
I am a member of: :iconthepencilclub:
Visit my website: midtel.net/~imaginee/

Summmertime

Thu Aug 30, 2007, 11:39 AM
I haven't updated my journal in many months so I thought I would take a moment to send a BIG HELLO out to all of you! Summertime I don't post much, I have had a few commissions and will upload them soon. I've been promoting my art a bit more and even have a piece in a local art gallery. Zahara is doing great and we have a new dog named Queenie, she was my mom-in-laws and now she is ours. Well that's it for now my friends....If you like leave me a comment and tell me what you have been up to. Take care~Linda

------------------------------------------------------------------

I have been asked many times for drawing tips, here are some I sent to a member a while back:

Tips and trade secrets I have many. Starting on a new drawing takes much time in selecting a great reference photo. Not only does the photo have to be clear and large but it needs to be detailed and interesting, also have excellent contrast. It takes me forever to select a ref....If I am drawing something new (that I have yet to draw) I will look at many references and take in as much info as possible before starting, I want to see the subject from all sides. After I select a ref I draw out a 1 inch grid using an h pencil, I then print out a few copies of the ref. one is for the grid one is printed out darker (to better see shadows), one lighter (to see details in shadows) and a few are close ups....it varies with each drawing. I draw a very light outline and then begin....

I start with the upper left corner and work my way down and to the right. I tend to turn the ref and drawing upside down and draw much of the piece like this, you can see shapes much easier this way.  I am constantly reminding myself to look closer at the subject, see the details and draw everything, see how the shadows fade away and draw it that way, see the different textures and draw them as they are. Details make the piece come alive so never pass up on any! I was working on a portrait last night and I got to the ear and I must say an ear is great practice, there are so many little in's and outs (highlights and shadows), as I drew I knew the ear needs to be 3d looking so I took much time with it and have to say I am very happy I did. I drew what I saw in the ref but also drew what I know an ear looks like. Most of what we draw is made up of precisely blended tones, so keep that in mind always.

Rushing through an area can ruin the whole piece so never ever rush. Finishing a small area at a time gives you the same feeling as when you finish the whole piece (u need to program yourself). I use mostly a 3b and H pencil, some plain tissue and a blending stick/stump. I draw a few details in a small area and then color in tones and blend them with the tissue, I then go back over that area and darken up the details and put a new layer down, blend and repeat if needed. If I am shading an area and I want it to be as dark as possible I never blend, I just color the area in with close together pencil strokes and then go back over it a few times until it is as dark as I can get it. Highlights are left untouched and if they do get smudged I lighten em up with the kneaded eraser. Using a Mechanical pencil is perfect for tiny details...wood pencils are great for filling in tones. I work about an inch an hour on details.

I use Strathmore Bristol (smooth or vellum), any name brand Mechanical pencils and Derwent wood pencils.

I hope this was of some help ~Linda

------------------------------------------------------------------

A few of my drawings, email me if you would like to buy a print: 1995imaginee@midtel.net
Anyone from DA will always receive a discount! :D

d r i n k by imaginee b e l l o by imaginee Liv Tyler finished by imaginee Vulnerable by imaginee
Depp by imaginee Free Spirit by imaginee 1965 Mustang Fastback by imaginee The face of Elise by imaginee
Droplet by imaginee pick meee by imaginee Little Tiger by imaginee Concept Drawing - The Gift by imaginee
Jennifer Garner portrait by imaginee Marilyn Monroe by imaginee e y e by imaginee Marilyn by imaginee
Halle Close-up by imaginee No Idea by imaginee

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I am a member of: :iconthepencilclub:
Visit my website: midtel.net/~imaginee/

100,000 visits!

Tue Jan 23, 2007, 11:00 PM
I just now saw that I went over 100,000 hits! WOW thank you for the visits!:) Life has been good, been busy with a few things, oh and I finally bought a new camera!  I got a Canon 30d and a few lens, my dog Zahara has been my model, the poor pup.  Drawing kinda took a back burner to the camera but one thing for sure is I can never go to long without a pencil in my hand. Thank you again for the visits, comments and favorites:) I'll be uploading more art to the gallery soon.  ~Linda

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I have been asked many times for drawing tips, here is a recent reply I sent in a note:

Tips and trade secrets I have many. Starting on a new drawing takes much time in selecting a great reference photo. Not only does the photo have to be clear and large but it needs to be detailed and interesting, also have excellent contrast. It takes me forever to select a ref....If I am drawing something new (that I have yet to draw) I will look at many references and take in as much info as possible before starting, I want to see the subject from all sides. After I select a ref I draw out a 1 inch grid using an h pencil, I then print out a few copies of the ref. one is for the grid one is printed out darker (to better see shadows), one lighter (to see details in shadows) and a few are close ups....it varies with each drawing. I draw a very light outline and then begin....

I start with the upper left corner and work my way down and to the right. I tend to turn the ref and drawing upside down and draw much of the piece like this. I am constantly reminding myself to look closer at the subject, see the details and draw everything, see how the shadows fade away and draw it that way, see the different textures and draw them as they are. Details make the piece come alive so never pass up on any! I was working on a portrait last night and I got to the ear and I must say an ear is great practice, there are so many little in's and outs (highlights and shadows), as I drew I knew the ear needs to be 3d looking so I took much time with it and have to say I am very happy I did. I drew what I saw in the ref but also drew what I know an ear looks like. Most of what we draw is made up of precisely blended tones, so keep that in mind always.

Rushing through an area can ruin the whole piece so never ever rush. Finishing a small area at a time gives you the same feeling as when you finish the whole piece (u need to program yourself). I use mostly a 3b or 2b and H pencil, some plain tissue and a blending stick/stump. I draw a few details in a small area and then color in tones and blend them with the tissue, I then go back over that area and darken up the details and put a new layer down, blend and repeat if needed. If I am shading an area and I want it to be as dark as possible I never blend, I just color the area in with close together pencil strokes and then go back over it a few times until it is as dark as I can get it. Highlights are left untouched and if they do get smudged I lighten em up with the kneaded eraser. Using a Mechanical pencil is perfect for tiny details...wood pencils are great for filling in tones.

I use Strathmore Bristol (smooth or vellum), any name brand Mechanical pencils and Derwent wood pencils.


I hope this was of some help :)~Linda

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A few of my drawings, email me if you would like to buy a print: 1995imaginee@midtel.net
Anyone from DA will always receive a discount! :D

d r i n k by imaginee b e l l o by imaginee Liv Tyler finished by imaginee Vulnerable by imaginee
Depp by imaginee Free Spirit by imaginee 1965 Mustang Fastback by imaginee The face of Elise by imaginee
Droplet by imaginee pick meee by imaginee Little Tiger by imaginee Concept Drawing - The Gift by imaginee
Jennifer Garner portrait by imaginee Marilyn Monroe by imaginee e y e by imaginee Marilyn by imaginee
Halle Close-up by imaginee No Idea by imaginee

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I am a member of: :iconthepencilclub:
Visit my website: midtel.net/~imaginee/

A Few Drawing Tips

Fri Oct 27, 2006, 10:55 PM
I have been asked many times for drawing tips, here is a recent reply I sent in a note:

Tips and trade secrets I have many. Starting on a new drawing takes much time in selecting a great reference photo. Not only does the photo have to be clear and large but it needs to be detailed and interesting, also have excellent contrast. It takes me forever to select a ref....If I am drawing something new (that I have yet to draw) I will look at many references and take in as much info as possible before starting, I want to see the subject from all sides. After I select a ref I draw out a 1 inch grid using an h pencil, I then print out a few copies of the ref. one is for the grid one is printed out darker (to better see shadows), one lighter (to see details in shadows) and a few are close ups....it varies with each drawing. I draw a very light outline and then begin....

I start with the upper left corner and work my way down and to the right. I tend to turn the ref and drawing upside down and draw much of the piece like this. I am constantly reminding myself to look closer at the subject, see the details and draw everything, see how the shadows fade away and draw it that way, see the different textures and draw them as they are. Details make the piece come alive so never pass up on any! I was working on a portrait last night and I got to the ear and I must say an ear is great practice, there are so many little in's and outs (highlights and shadows), as I drew I knew the ear needs to be 3d looking so I took much time with it and have to say I am very happy I did. I drew what I saw in the ref but also drew what I know an ear looks like. Most of what we draw is made up of precisely blended tones, so keep that in mind always.

Rushing through an area can ruin the whole piece so never ever rush. Finishing a small area at a time gives you the same feeling as when you finish the whole piece (u need to program yourself). I use mostly a 3b or 2b and H pencil, some plain tissue and a blending stick/stump. I draw a few details in a small area and then color in tones and blend them with the tissue, I then go back over that area and darken up the details and put a new layer down, blend and repeat if needed. If I am shading an area and I want it to be as dark as possible I never blend, I just color the area in with close together pencil strokes and then go back over it a few times until it is as dark as I can get it. Highlights are left untouched and if they do get smudged I lighten em up with the kneaded eraser. Using a Mechanical pencil is perfect for tiny details...wood pencils are great for filling in tones.

I use Strathmore Bristol (smooth or vellum), any name brand Mechanical pencils and Derwent wood pencils.


I hope this was of some help :)~Linda

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A few of my drawings, email me if you would like to buy a print: 1995imaginee@midtel.net
Anyone from DA will always receive a discount! :D

d r i n k by imaginee b e l l o by imaginee
Liv Tyler finished by imaginee Vulnerable by imaginee
Depp by imaginee Free Spirit by imaginee
1965 Mustang Fastback by imaginee The face of Elise by imaginee
Droplet by imaginee pick meee by imaginee
Little Tiger by imaginee Concept Drawing - The Gift by imaginee
Jennifer Garner portrait by imaginee No Idea by imaginee
e y e by imaginee Windswept by imaginee

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I am a member of: :iconthepencilclub:
Visit my website: midtel.net/~imaginee/
Hi there, I wanted to first thank DA for the DD today, I am so happy that "Windswept" was selected for this great honor.  Thank you to all that left comments and favorited the drawing!! :hug:

Life has been great, summer came and went but was full of great times. I don't post much in the summer and try not to be on the computer as much.  I have drawn a little here and there and try never to go to long without working on a piece.  

My beautiful dog Zahara is now 6 months old, I put together a few pics from each month for you to see. Must tell you she is a rip, talk about a big personality!  I've learned that rotties are very much like children in that they want your attention all the time and will get it anyway they can. *lol*
My puppy Zahara then and now by imaginee

~Linda

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A few of my drawings, email me if you would like to buy a print: 1995imaginee@midtel.net
Anyone from DA will always receive a discount! :D

d r i n k by imaginee b e l l o by imaginee
Liv Tyler finished by imaginee Vulnerable by imaginee
Depp by imaginee Free Spirit by imaginee
1965 Mustang Fastback by imaginee The face of Elise by imaginee
Droplet by imaginee pick meee by imaginee
Little Tiger by imaginee Concept Drawing - The Gift by imaginee
Jennifer Garner portrait by imaginee No Idea by imaginee
e y e by imaginee Windswept by imaginee

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I am a member of: :iconthepencilclub:
Visit my website: midtel.net/~imaginee/

My New Puppy

Sun May 28, 2006, 9:29 AM
Her name is Zahara, a friend of mine had Rottweiler pups, we fell in love with this little girl and next we knew we had adopted her.

Edit: New pics of Zahara (I'll add more every few weeks)

Zahara by imaginee Zahara 5-27 by imaginee

~Linda

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The winner of the art print and my 50,000 visitor is:
EagleTheCheetah
:iconeaglethecheetah:

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A few of my drawings, email me if you would like to buy a print: 1995imaginee@midtel.net
Anyone from DA will always receive a discount! :D

d r i n k by imaginee b e l l o by imaginee Liv Tyler finished by imaginee Vulnerable by imaginee

Depp by imaginee Free Spirit by imaginee 1965 Mustang Fastback by imaginee The face of Elise by imaginee

Droplet by imaginee pick meee by imaginee Little Tiger by imaginee Concept Drawing - The Gift by imaginee

Jennifer Garner portrait by imaginee No Idea by imaginee

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I am a member of: :iconthepencilclub:
Visit my website: midtel.net/~imaginee/

A DD from DA!

Thu Apr 20, 2006, 8:39 PM
Hello there! :wave: Today I got a DD for my Halle Close-up. It was a big surprise and I am truly honored!  I want to once again thank isabellacantinos for suggesting me and zeruch for the Feature!

I want to also thank all that have visited and left me comments, I will be reading them for sometime now!  I will try and pop in to your DA pages over time to say hi. :D Thank you also for all the favorites and watches too!!

It's been a long haul for me, I started to draw at age 4 and to this day I'm still at it!  I feel I have grown much over the years but also know that I still have a ways to go, each piece is a fun challenge and I tend to learn something new, if anything I hope I never ever stop learning. :nod:


Take care my friends ~Linda

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The winner of the art print and my 50,000 visitor is:
EagleTheCheetah
:iconeaglethecheetah:

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A few of my drawings, email me if you would like to buy a print: 1995imaginee@midtel.net
Anyone from DA will always receive a discount! :D

d r i n k by imaginee b e l l o by imaginee Liv Tyler finished by imaginee Vulnerable by imaginee

Depp by imaginee Free Spirit by imaginee 1965 Mustang Fastback by imaginee The face of Elise by imaginee

Droplet by imaginee pick meee by imaginee Little Tiger by imaginee Concept Drawing - The Gift by imaginee

Jennifer Garner portrait by imaginee No Idea by imaginee

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I am a member of: :iconthepencilclub:
Visit my website: midtel.net/~imaginee/

50,000th visitor wins a free print!

Tue Mar 21, 2006, 11:10 PM
The winner of the art print and my 50,000 visitor is:
EagleTheCheetah
:iconeaglethecheetah:

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Take a screen shot of my DA page if you are my 50,000th visitor and win a free print from the below list.  I don't have a DA print account but do have 11 x 14 inch prints of my drawings, I will ship the print anywhere in the USA or Canada for free.  International winners will have to pay for shipping, sorry, to calculate the Airmail postage go here and look for 32 oz weight: pe.usps.com/text/pub51/51tblb_…

If you would like to buy a print,  email me: 1995imaginee@midtel.net
Anyone from DA will receive a discount! :D

d r i n k by imaginee b e l l o by imaginee Liv Tyler finished by imaginee Vulnerable by imaginee

Depp by imaginee Free Spirit by imaginee 1965 Mustang Fastback by imaginee The face of Elise by imaginee

Droplet by imaginee pick meee by imaginee Little Tiger by imaginee Concept Drawing - The Gift by imaginee

Jennifer Garner portrait by imaginee No Idea by imaginee

To take a screen shot,  press the "PrtSc"  key on your keyboard, open an image editor (PSP, Paint) select Paste from the Edit menu and save the image.

:bulletblue:  Exciting news to share: I'm flying to California on the 28th for two weeks to visit my brother and family! This will be my first visit to the west coast, besides the plane ride I am looking forward to finally seeing the San Francisco area. :)
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A very big thank you to all of you that have stopped by and left comments :hug: also thank you for the favorites and watches. I want you to know I read every single comment, and I visit a lot of your galleries, I leave comments at times but tend to look and read more then write. ~Linda

I am a member of: :iconthepencilclub:
Visit my website: midtel.net/~imaginee/
  • Listening to: I'm leaving on a jet plane....
Opps, I made a mistake, I thought my page views were going on 50,000, so the offer in my last journal will only be goood sometime wayyyy down the road. :) What a dope I am *lol*...


Soooo how is everyone doing, it's been a while since I've wrote anything in my journal.  I've been a little busy with a couple of commissions, life is goood... been busy also getting my house in ship shape, we're planing on putting the house on the market come this spring. :)  

Well take care my friends and please drop me a line here, tell me how life is for you.:)

A very big thank you to all of you that have stopped by and left comments :hug: also thank you for the favorites and watches. I want you to know I read every single comment, and I visit a lot of your galleries, I leave comments at times but tend to look and read more then write. ~Linda

I am a member of: :iconthepencilclub:
Visit my website: midtel.net/~imaginee/

Hi DA friends

Tue Dec 27, 2005, 2:58 PM
Happy New Year to all!!

May 2006 be a wonderful year for everyone!

:snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake:

A very big thank you to all of you that have stopped by and left comments :hug: also thank you for the favorites and watches. I want you to know I read every single comment, and I visit a lot of your galleries, I leave comments at times but tend to look and read more then write. ~Linda

I am a member of: :iconthepencilclub:
For a while there has been talk in my town about the Dam having structural damage and how if it did brake thousands would be flooded, the Gilboa Dam holds back 19 billion gallons of water. I've been so worried about this latly and pray that we don't get any heavy rains, my friend Shirley lives along the Schoharie creek, her and everyone else that live anywhere near the water would be in grave danger. Here is a recent story about the dam:

:snowflake: Montgomery County officials are working on emergency evacuation plans after learning the Gilboa Dam could break during a bad flood -- and one plan being discussed could actually cause flooding this spring...

Click link to read: www.capitalnews9.com/content/h…

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:snowflake: I haven't drawn a new piece in a while, been however working on the horse head drawing off and on, will post it very soon....for now I'll post the wip stages in my scraps folder.  I do plan to start work on a new portrait next week.  :)
Click to view wip: www.deviantart.com/deviation/2…

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:snowflake: Ebay has been going good, last week I sold all 5 prints listed, this was very exciting for me.  Each week I'll try and list new prints and they will always be very reasonable priced so have a look and bid if you want. :)  
My Ebay auctions: search.ebay.com/_W0QQsassZimag…

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A very big thank you to all of you that have stopped by and left comments :hug: also thank you for the favorites and watches.  I want you to know I read every single comment, and I visit a lot of your galleries, I leave comments at times but tend to look and read more then write.  ~Linda

I am a member of: :iconthepencilclub:
Hi there, I was without electricity for almost 2 days over here due to a snow storm...it's good to be back! :D

Well here are the results of the ebay auctions:  
I sold 2 out of 5 prints. The buyer paid me right away using paypal, he also sent me extra shipping money then what was asked. Here is a brake down on everything:

Money I received from ebay buyer...............$69.50

Ebay Insertion fees plus the Final Value Fees $5.60
Shipping of pkg. fee ...................................$6.20
Paypal fee .................................................$2.32

Total profit.................................................$55.38

If not for the extra shipping money received I would of made a total profit of approximately $18.00 I'm not sure if it's worth it, it's more like gambling then anything else. I'm planning to keep at it for a little while longer, I just now listed 5 new prints. Oh and there is a slight learning curve for setting up and running an auction, I would be willing to help anyone out there that is thinking of selling on ebay.

Here is the link to my new auctions: search.ebay.com/_W0QQsassZimag…

That's about it for now, I want to once again thank all of you that have left comments, and also for the favorites and watches. :hug: ~Linda
Since I have no feedback on ebay I need to try once again to sell something, I decided to auction off a few of my art prints this time. I want ppl to get to know my work and myself on ebay, it seems if you don't have feedback no one wants anything to do with you.

edit 10-22: I have been asked a few times for the links, I hope it's alright to just post them here.  The auctions are doing ok, I have 3 bids so far and I hope to get more, but I'm happy that at least two items will be sold.

Auctions... search.ebay.com/_W0QQsassZimag…

I have some other news to share with you all.  I now have full rights from the copyright owner of the Marilyn Monroe photo I used as reference, it took me a month to track the man down! So now if I want I can sell the portrait. :)

As for drawing I'm working on a new one, it's of a horse head, so far so good... I'll post it when I'm done, and that's about it.

Once again thank you for the visits, commments, watches and favorites!!:hug:

I am a member of: :iconthepencilclub:
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I take commissions so please note me if you would like to have a portrait drawn, or anything else! Visit my web site for more information: midtel.net/~imaginee/
Hi again, I wanted to thank each of you for stopping by and leaving comments on my work, I appreciate your kind words very much. I want you to know I read every comment and note, I reply back to the notes so if you have questions please send one. I also want to thank you for the watches and favorites.

I'm still thinking of what I would like to draw next. I been looking for good horse reference photos, I use to draw horses when I was a teen, would like to do a full body and perhaps draw it in motion. The MM portrait was a lot of fun to draw, I would love to draw an original of her, I have a few sketches I did and may take on a new one of her down the road...stilll thinking what will be next.

I did a seven person portrait commission a while back, it took over a month and was very interesting and challenging to do, I placed the image in the "Webcam" section on my DA page.  I will use that area to show work that was on my drawing board.

Oh and as I have mentioned before 11 x 14 inch prints are available for many of my drawings, so if you're interested please contact me. Visit my website for more information: midtel.net/~imaginee/

Take care my friends and thank you once again :hug:
~Linda